.: Tony McGoldrick's Tamiya M109A6 Paladin - US Self-Propelled Howitzer

Brand:
Tamiya
Scale:
1/35th
Modelling Time:
~8 hours
PE/Resin Detail:
No
Comments:

Fun build - went together well!

M109 Howitzer

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M109 Howitzer
Artillery Corps Fires Practice Cannon3.jpg
Israeli Defense Force M-109 in action during military exercise.
Type Self-propelled artillery
Place of origin United States
Specifications
Weight 27.5 tons
Length 30 ft (9.1 m)
Width 10 ft 4 in (3.15 m)
Height 10 ft 8 in (3.25 m)
Crew 6 (2 Loaders, Gunner, Assistant Gunner, Commander, Driver)

Shell separate loading, bagged charge
Caliber 155 mm L/39 caliber[1]
Breech interrupted screw
Traverse 360°
Rate of fire Maximum: 6 rpm
Sustained: 3 rpm
Effective range Conventional: 18 km (11 mi)
RAP: 30 km (19 mi)

Main
armament
M126 155 mm Howitzer
Secondary
armament
.50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 machine gun
Engine Detroit Diesel 8V71T
450 hp (335.56 kW)
Power/weight 18.7 hp/t
Suspension torsion-bar
Operational
range
216 mi (350 km)
Speed 35 mph (56 km/h)

The M109 is an American-made self-propelled 155 mm howitzer, first introduced in the early 1960s. It was upgraded a number of times to today's M109A6 Paladin. The M109 family is the most common Western indirect-fire support weapon of maneuver brigades of armored and mechanized infantry divisions.

The M109 has a crew of six: the section chief, the driver, the gunner, the assistant gunner and two ammunition handlers. The gunner aims the cannon left or right (deflection), the assistant gunner aims the cannon up and down (quadrant). The M109A6 Paladin needs only a crew of four: the commander, driver, gunner and ammunition loader.

The British Army replaced its M109s with the AS-90. Several European armed forces have or are currently replacing older M109s with the German PzH 2000. Upgrades to the M109 were introduced by the U.S. (see variants below) and by Switzerland (KAWEST). With the cancellation of the U.S. Crusader, the Paladin remains the principal self-propelled howitzer for the U.S. for the foreseeable future.

History

The M109 was the medium variant of a U.S. program to adopt a common chassis for its self-propelled artillery units. The light version, the M108 Howitzer, was phased out during the Vietnam War, but many were rebuilt as M109s.

The M109 saw its combat debut in Vietnam. Israel used the M109 against Egypt in the 1973 Yom Kippur War and in the 1982 Lebanon War and 2006 Lebanon War. Iran used the M109 in the Iran–Iraq War, in the 1980s. The M109 saw service with the British Army, the Egyptian Army and Saudi Arabian Army in the 1991 Gulf War. The M109 also saw service with the U.S. Army in the Gulf War, as well as in the Iraq War from 2003 to present.

Upgrades to the cannon, ammunition, fire control, survivability, and other electronics systems over the design's lifespan have expanded the system's capabilities, including tactical nuclear projectiles, Cannon Launched Guided Projectiles (CLGP or Copperhead), Rocket Assisted Projectile (RAP), FAmily of SCAtterable Mines (FASCAM), and improved conventional munitions (the Dual-Purpose Improved Conventional Munition, DPICM).

The developing BCT Ground Combat Vehicle Program will likely replace the M109 as well as many other US army vehicles.

Design

The M109 was developed by the Ground System Division of United Defense LP (now BAE Systems Land and Armaments)[1]

Armament

Open breech of M109A5 howitzer.

Please go to Wikipedia, if you want any further information

Thanks Wikipedia!

Box art:


Click on each image for a closer look

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