.: Tony McGoldrick's Tamiya 1/35th SAS Land Rover

To give a detailed account of the history of the British SAS during World War II and on would take a book. However due to the fact that we can't provide the space for a detailed account of there actions, we can give a brief history of the unit and it role during World War II. 

The British SAS (Special Air Service) is one of the world's premier special forces teams. The history of the SAS dates back to WWII, when Captain David Stirling developed the concept while recuperating from a parachute accident. David Stirling attempted to propose his idea to the CO. The guards at the gate wouldn't let him into the building, so Stirling jumped the fence and proceeded to walk into the office.The SAS was initially created as a desert raiding force to weaken Rommel's North African logistics network as well as hinder aircraft operations. Their first successful raid happened in December of 1941, when two groups destroyed 61 aircraft at two airfields.When the force ran out of explosives, SAS soldiers began to use their personal weapons to shoot out the controls. One man, Paddy Mayne, proceeded to rip out the controls with his hands.Another raid was launched soon after; this time twenty seven airplanes were destroyed. 

The SAS operated in Europe as well; in one operation (codenamed Houndsmith),144 men were parachuted with jeeps and supplies into an area close to Dijon, France. All told, the SAS inflicted 7,733 German casualties in Europe. 4,784 prisoners were captured and 700 vehicles were destroyed or captured. 164 railways were cut, seven trains were destroyed and thirty-three were derailed. The SAS was also used to "mop up" German war criminals. They hunted down head SS and Gestapo agents and brought them before the War Crimes Tribune. 

David Stirling was knighted in 1990. He died a few months later at the age of 74. He was awarded the OBE and DSO for actions during WWII. He was nicknamed the "Phantom Major" by his peers. During World War II ,Sir David Stirling was captured by the Germans. Although Hitler had ordered all "special forces" (OSS and SAS) to be executed, David Stirling escaped executions by not saying anything about himself. He was held in various prisons. He proceeded to escape four times, each time being caught. He never gave up though. He was finally moved to Colditz for the rest of the war. His brother, William Stirling, took over his command while David was held prisoner. 

Post WW2:

After the war, the SAS saw action in Oman, Aden, Malaya, Borneo, and to some extent, Vietnam (apparently in U.S., Australian, or New Zealand uniforms).These operations were mainly of the counterinsurgency type. They have also been deployed in Ulster against the IRA, with some twenty-five IRA members being killed by the SAS in the eleven years between 1976 and 1987. 

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