Debut: June 2017

 




   

.: Stephen Brown's Honda CB750F

Brand:

Tamiya
#14066

Scale:

1/12

Modelling Time:

20 hrs

PE/Resin Detail:

none

Comments:

"Nice kit to put together."

Honda CB750

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Honda CB750
HONDA DREAM-CB750FOUR.jpg
1969 Honda CB750
Manufacturer Honda
Also called Honda Dream CB750 Four[1]
Production 1969–2003, 2007
Assembly Wakō, Saitama, Japan
HamamatsuShizuoka Prefecture, Japan
Suzuka, Mie, Japan[2]
Successor CB900F
Class Sport bike or standard
Engine 736 cc (44.9 cu in) SOHC air-cooledstraight four (1969–1978)[1]
DOHC air-cooled straight 4 (1979–2003, 2007)
Bore / stroke 61 mm × 63 mm (2.4 in × 2.5 in)[1]
Top speed 125 mph (201 km/h)
Power

51 kW (68 hp) @ 8500 rpm (1969)[3]

50 kW (67 hp) @ 8000 rpm (DIN)[1][4]
Torque 44 lbf·ft (60 N·m) @ 7000 rpm
Transmission 5-speed
Suspension Front: telescopic forks
Rear: swingarm with two spring/shock units.
Brakes Front disc / Rear drum
Tires Front: 3.25" x 19"
Rear: 4.00" x 18"
Raketrail 94 mm (3.7 in)
Wheelbase 1,460 mm (57.3 in)
Dimensions L: 2,200 mm (85 in)
W: 890 mm (35 in)
H: 1,100 mm (44 in)
Seat height 790 mm (31 in)
Weight 218 kg (481 lb)[1] (dry)
233 kg (513 lb)[5] (wet)
Fuel capacity 19 L (4.2 imp gal; 5.0 US gal)[1]
Fuel consumption 34.3 mpg‑US (6.86 L/100 km; 41.2 mpg‑imp)[6]

The Honda CB750 is an air-cooled transverse in-line four cylinder engine motorcycle made by Honda over several generations for year models 1969–2003 as well as 2007 with an upright or standard riding posture. It is often called the original Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM).[4][7]

Though other manufacturers had marketed the transverse, overhead camshaft, inline four-cylinder engine configuration and the layout had been used in racing engines prior to World War II, Honda popularized the configuration with the CB750, and the layout subsequently became the dominant sport bike engine layout.

The CB750 is included in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Classic Bikes;[8][9] was named in the Discovery Channel's "Greatest Motorbikes Ever;"[10] was in The Art of the Motorcycle exhibition,[11] and is in the UK National Motor Museum.[12] The Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, Inc. rates the 1969 CB750 as one of the 240 Landmarks of Japanese Automotive Technology.[1]

The CB750 was the first motorcycle to be called a "superbike."[6][11]

---------//------------

1981

The CB750F'81 750 Super Sport was sold in 1981 and was available in one of two colors: Black or Pleiades Silver Metallic. The stripes on the black bike were red; but on the silver bike they were black and blue. The front disc brakes were slotted with dual piston calipers; the rear had a single disc brake. The front fender was redesigned. There was a rear spoiler behind the seat. The exhaust was a 4-into-2. The engine was a 749cc DOHC 4-valve air-cooled inline 4 cylinder linked to a 5-speed transmission.

  • Serial Number
    • Frame: JH2RC040*BM200004
    • Engine: RC04E-2200005

1981 Honda Motorcycle Full-Line Brochure

1982

The CB750F'82 750 Super Sport was sold in 1982 and was available in one of two colors: Black or Pleiades Silver Metallic. The stripes on the black bike were orange and red; but on the silver bike they were black and blue. The front disc brakes were slotted with dual piston calipers; the rear had a single disc brake. The front fender was redesigned. There was a rear spoiler behind the seat. The exhaust was a 4-into-2. The engine color was black. The engine was a 749cc DOHC 4-valve air-cooled inline 4 cylinder linked to a 5-speed transmission.

  • Serial Number
    • Frame: JH2RC040*CM300003
    • Engine: RC04E-2300001

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Box art:

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