Debut: April 2015

 




   

.: Pat McCumiskey's Cromwell Cruiser

Brand:

Tamiya

Scale:

1/35

Modelling Time:

~ hrs

PE/Resin Detail:

none

Comments:

"comments"

Cromwell tank

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tank, Cruiser, Mk VIII, Cromwell (A27M)
Cromwell in the Kubinka Museum.jpg
Cromwell Mk VII in the Kubinka Tank Museum
Type Cruiser tank
Place of origin United Kingdom
Service history
In service 1944–1955
Used by British ArmyIsraeli Army,Greek ArmyPortuguese Army
Wars World War II1948 Arab–Israeli WarKorean War
Production history
Designer Leyland, then Birmingham Railway Carriage and Wagon Company from 1942[1]
Manufacturer Nuffield Mechanisation and Aero
Number built 4,016
Specifications
Weight 27.6 long tons (28 tonnes)
Length 20 ft 10 in (6.35 m)
Width 9 ft 6 1⁄2 in (2.908 m)
Height 8 ft 2 in (2.49 m)
Crew 5 (Commander, gunner, loader/radio operator, driver, front gunner)

Armour 3 inches (76 mm)
Main
armament
Ordnance QF 75 mm
with 64 rounds
Secondary
armament
2 x 7.92 mm Besa machine gun
with 4,950 rounds
Engine Rolls-Royce Meteor V12 petrol
600 horsepower (450 kW)
Power/weight 21.4 hp/tonne
Transmission Merritt-Brown Z.5 gearbox (five forward and one reverse gear) driving rear sprockets
Suspension Improved Christie
Ground clearance 16 inches
Fuel capacity 110 gallons + optional 30 gallon auxiliary
Operational
range
170 miles (270 km) on roads, 80 miles cross country[2]
Speed 40 miles per hour (64 km/h) with 3.7:1 final reduction drive
 

Tank, Cruiser, Mk VIII, Cromwell (A27M),[a] and the related Centaur (A27L) tank, were one of the most successful series of cruiser tanks fielded by Britain in the Second World War. The Cromwell tank, named after the English Civil War leader Oliver Cromwell, was the first tank put into service by the British to combine a dual-purpose gun, high speed from the powerful and reliable Meteor engine, and reasonable armour, in a balanced package. Its design formed the basis of the Comet tank.

The Cromwell and Centaur differed in the engine used. While the Centaur had the Liberty engine of the predecessor cruiser tank, the Crusader (and the interim A24 Cavalier), the Cromwell had the significantly more powerful Meteor. Apart from the engine and associated transmission differences, the two tanks were the same and many Centaurs built were fitted with the Meteor to make them Cromwells.

The Cromwell first saw action in the Battle of Normandy in June 1944. The tank equipped the armoured reconnaissance regiments, of the Royal Armoured Corps, within the 7th, 11th and Guards Armoured Divisions. While the armoured regiments of the latter two divisions were equipped with M4 Shermans, the armoured regiments of the 7th Armoured Division were equipped with Cromwell tanks. The Centaurs were not used in combat except for those fitted with a 95mm howitzer, which were used in support of the Royal Marines during the invasion of Normandy.

Development

Initial designs

Development of the Cromwell and Centaur dates to 1940, as the Crusader tank was being readied for service. The General Staff was aware that the Crusader would become obsolete, and in late 1940 they set out the specifications for the new tank to replace it. The tank was to be fitted with the QF 6 pounder gun and was expected to enter service in 1942.

Vauxhall responded with the A23, a scaled down version of their A22 Churchill infantry tank. This would have had 75 mm of frontal armour, used a 12-cylinder Bedford engine, carried a crew of five and would have the same suspension as the A22.

Nuffield submitted the A24, heavily based on its Crusader design and powered by its version of the Liberty engine, a V-12 design dating the late days of World War I and now thoroughly outdated. Nevertheless, as the design was based on the Crusader, it was expected it could be put into production rapidly.

The final entry was from Leyland and Birmingham Railway Carriage & Wagon (BRC&W). Their design[b] was similar to the Nuffield, but with different suspension and tracks.[3]

The designs were received and examined in January 1941, with Nuffield's A24 being declared the winner on 17 January. Six prototypes of the Cromwell I were ordered for the spring of 1942. These arrived four months late and by this time the design was already outdated. It was put into production anyway, but in service it proved entirely underpowered and only a small number were built.

Delays in the A24 program led to demands to get the QF 6 pounder into service earlier. This led to a series of up-gunned Crusaders mounting the 6-pounder.[4]

Please go to Wikipedia, if you want any further information

Thanks Wikipedia!

Box art:

Click on each image for a closer look

Web site contents Copyright Eastern Suburbs Scale Modelling Club 2015, All rights reserved.