.: Harry McCumiskey's North American P-51 Mustang

Brand:

Hobby Boss

Scale:

1/72

Modelling Time:

~ hrs

PE/Resin Detail:

none

Comments:

"comments"

North American P-51 Mustang

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"P-51" redirects here. For other uses, see P51 (disambiguation).
P-51 Mustang
Bott4.jpg
P-51 Mustangs of the 375th Fighter SquadronEighth Air Force mid-1944.
Role Fighter
National origin United States
Manufacturer North American Aviation
First flight 26 October 1940
Introduction 1942
Status Retired from military service 1984 (Dominican Air Force)[1]
Primary users United States Army Air Forces
Royal Air Force
Chinese Nationalist Air Force
numerous others (see below)
Number built More than 15,000[2]
Unit cost
US$50,985 in 1945[3]
Variants North American A-36
Rolls-Royce Mustang Mk.X
Cavalier Mustang
Developed into North American F-82 Twin Mustang
Piper PA-48 Enforcer
Rolls-Royce Mustang Mk.X

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA) in response to a specification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission. The prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, 102 days after the contract was signed and, with an engine installed, first flew on 26 October.[4][5][6]

The Mustang was originally designed to use the Allison V-1710 engine, which had limited high-altitude performance. It was first flown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber (Mustang Mk I). The addition of the Rolls-Royce Merlin to the P-51B/C model transformed the Mustang's performance at altitudes above 15,000 ft, matching or bettering that of the Luftwaffe's fighters.[7][nb 1] The definitive version, the P-51D, was powered by the Packard V-1650-7, a license-builtversion of the Rolls-Royce Merlin 60 series two-stage two-speed supercharged engine, and armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns.[9]

From late 1943, P-51Bs (supplemented by P-51Ds from mid-1944) were used by the USAAF's Eighth Air Force to escort bombers in raids over Germany, while the RAF's 2 TAF and the USAAF's Ninth Air Force used the Merlin-powered Mustangs as fighter-bombers, roles in which the Mustang helped ensure Allied air superiority in 1944.[10] The P-51 was also in service with Allied air forces in the North African, Mediterranean and Italian theaters, and saw limited service against the Japanese in the Pacific War. During World War II, Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down.[nb 2]

At the start of the Korean War, the Mustang was the main fighter of the United Nations until jet fighters such as the F-86 took over this role; the Mustang then became a specialized fighter-bomber. Despite the advent of jet fighters, the Mustang remained in service with some air forces until the early 1980s. After World War II and the Korean War, many Mustangs were converted for civilian use, especially air racing, and increasingly, preserved and flown as historic warbird aircraft at airshows.

Design and development

North American NA-73X; note the short carburetor air intake scoop and the frameless, rounded windscreen. On production Mustang Is the latter was replaced with a three-piece unit incorporating a bullet resistant windscreen.

In April 1938, shortly after the German Anschluss of Austria, the British government established a purchasing commission in the United States, headed by Sir Henry Self.[12] Self was given overall responsibility for Royal Air Force (RAF) production and research and development, and also served with Sir Wilfrid Freeman, the "Air Member for Development and Production". Self also sat on the British Air Council Sub-committee on Supply (or "Supply Committee") and one of his tasks was to organize the manufacturing and supply of American fighter aircraft for the RAF. At the time, the choice was very limited, as no U.S. aircraft then in production or flying met European standards, with only the Curtiss P-40 Tomahawk coming close. The Curtiss-Wright plant was running at capacity, so P-40s were in short supply.[13]

 

Please go to Wikipedia, if you want any further information

Thanks Wikipedia!

 

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Box art: (a guess....)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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