Debut: March 2017

 




   

.: Ervin Torok's Panzerkampfwagen II Ausf.A/B/C (Sd.Kfz.131)

Brand:

Tamiya
# 35292

Scale:

1:35

Modelling Time:

20 hours

PE/Resin Detail:

none

Comments:

"Really nice kit.
Nicely detailed, easy fitting. "

Panzer II

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Panzerkampfwagen II
PzKpfw II 01.jpg
Panzer II at the Belgrade Military Museum
Type Light tank
Place of origin Nazi Germany
Service history
In service 1936–1945
Wars World War II
Production history
Designed 1934
Produced 1935–1943
No. built 1,856 (excluding conversions)
Specifications (Ausf. A-C)
Weight 8.9 t (8.8 long tons)
Length 4.81 m (15 ft 9 in)
Width 2.22 m (7 ft 3 in)
Height 1.99 m (6 ft 6 in)
Crew 3 (commander/gunner, driver, loader)

Armor 5–14.5 mm (0.20–0.57 in)
Main
armament
1 × 2 cm KwK 30 Ausf. a–F
1 × 2 cm KwK 38 Ausf. J–L
Secondary
armament
1 × 7.92 mm Maschinengewehr 34
Engine Maybach HL 62TRM 6-cylinder petrol
140 PS (138 hp, 103 kW)
Power/weight 15.7 PS (11.6 kW) / tonne
Suspension Leaf spring
Operational
range
200 km (120 mi)
Speed 40 km/h (25 mph)

The Panzer II is the common name used for a family of German tanks used in World War II. The official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen II (abbreviated PzKpfw II).

Although the vehicle had originally been designed as a stopgap while larger, more advanced tanks were developed, it nonetheless went on to play an important role in the early years of World War II, during the Polish and French campaigns. The Panzer II was the most numerous tank in the German Panzer divisions beginning with the invasion of France. It was used in both North Africa against the Western Allies and on the Eastern Front against the Soviet Union.

The Panzer II was supplanted by the Panzer III and IV by 1940/1941. By the end of 1942, it had been largely removed from front line service and it was used for training and on secondary fronts. The turrets of the then-obsolete PzKpfw Is and PzKpfw IIs were reused as gun turrets on specially built defensive bunkers,[1] particularly on the Atlantic Wall. Production of the tank itself ceased by 1943, but its chassis remained in use as the basis of several other armored vehicles, chiefly self-propelled artillery and tank destroyers such as the Wespe and Marder II.

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Main production models

Panzer II Ausf. A, B and C

The first true production model, the Ausf. A, included an armor upgrade to 14.5 mm. / 0.57086614 in. on all sides, as well as a 14.5 mm floor plate, and an improved transmission. It entered production in July 1937 and was superseded by the Ausf. B in December 1937, introducing only minimal changes.

PzKpfw II Ausf. C at the Musée des Blindés.

Few minor changes were made in the Ausf. C version, which became the standard production model from June 1938 through April 1940. A total of 1,113 examples of Ausf. c, A, B, and C tanks were built from March 1937 through April 1940 by AlkettFAMO, Daimler-Benz, Henschel, MAN, MIAG, and Wegmann. These models were almost identical and were used in service interchangeably. This was the most widespread tank version of the Panzer II. Earlier versions of Ausf. C have a rounded hull front, but many had additional armor plates bolted on the turret and hull front. Some were also retro-fitted with commander's cupolas.

Panzer II Ausf. D and E

With a completely new torsion bar suspension[2] with four road wheels, the Ausf. D was developed as a tank for use in the cavalry divisions. Only the turret was the same as the Ausf. C model, with a new hull and superstructure design and the use of a Maybach HL62TRM engine driving a seven-gear transmission (plus reverse). The design was shorter (4.65 m) but wider (2.3 m) and taller (2.06 m) than the Ausf. C. Speed was increased to 55 km/h. A total of 143 Ausf. D and Ausf. E tanks were built from May 1938 through August 1939 by MAN, and they served in Poland. They were withdrawn in March 1940 for conversion to other types after proving to have poor off-road performance. The Ausf. E improved some small items of the suspension, but was otherwise similar and served alongside the Ausf. D.

Panzer II Ausf. F

Continuing the conventional design of the Ausf. C, the Ausf. F superstructure front was made from a single piece of armor plate with a redesigned visor. Also, a dummy visor was placed next to it to confuse enemy gunners. The hull was redesigned with a flat 35 mm plate on its front, and the armor of the superstructure and turret were built up to 30 mm on the front with 15 mm to the sides and rear. There was some minor alteration of the suspension and a new commander's cupola as well. Weight was increased to 9.5 tonnes. From March 1941 to December 1942, 524 were built; this was the final major tank version of the Panzer II series.

Panzer II (Flamm)

Based on the same suspension as the Ausf. D and Ausf. E tank versions, the Flamm (also known as "Flamingo"[3]) used a new turret mounting a single MG34 machine gun, and two remotely controlled flamethrowers mounted in small turrets at each front corner of the vehicle.[4] Each flamethrower could cover the front 180° arc, while the turret traversed 360°.

The flamethrowers were supplied with 320 litres of fuel and four tanks of compressed nitrogen. The nitrogen tanks were built into armored boxes along each side of the superstructure. Armor was 30 mm to the front and 14.5 mm to the side and rear, although the turret was increased to 20 mm at the sides and rear.

Total weight was 12 tonnes and dimensions were increased to a length of 4.9 m and width of 2.4 m although it was a bit shorter at 1.85 m tall. A FuG2 radio was carried. Two sub-variants existed: the Ausf. A and Ausf. B which differed only in minor suspension components.

One hundred and fifty-five Flamm vehicles were built from January 1940 through March 1942. These were mostly on new chassis, but 43 were converted from Panzer II Ausf. D/E. The Flammpanzer II was deployed in the USSR, but was not very successful due to its limited armor, and survivors were soon withdrawn for conversion to Marder II tank destroyers in December 1941.

Panzer II Ausf. L "Luchs"
Panzer II Ausf. L in the Musée des BlindésSaumur.

A light reconnaissance tank, the Ausf. L, was the only Panzer II design with the Schachtellaufwerk overlapping/interleaved road wheels and "slack track" configuration to enter series production, with 100 being built from September 1943 to January 1944 in addition to the conversion of the four Ausf. M tanks. Originally given the experimental designation VK 1303, it was adopted under the alternate name Panzerspähwagen II and given the popular name Luchs (Lynx). The Luchs was larger than the Ausf. G in most dimensions (length 4.63 m; height 2.21 m; width 2.48 m). It was equipped with a six speed transmission (plus reverse), and could reach a speed of 60 km/h with a range of 290 km. The FuG12 and FuG Spr a radios were installed, while 330 rounds of 20 mm and 2,250 rounds of 7.92 mm ammunition were carried. Total vehicle weight was 11.8 tonnes.

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Boxart:

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